Feeding Tube Insertion (PEG)

What is Feeding Tube Insertion (PEG)?

Feeding tube insertion, or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), is a procedure in which a tube is placed directly into the stomach. The tube allows for nutrition, fluids, and medication to flow directly into the stomach without passing through the mouth or esophagus. This procedure might be especially helpful if a patient has difficulty swallowing, or inability to consume adequate nutrition by mouth.

Is Feeding Tube Insertion (PEG) Safe?

Feeding tube insertion (PEG) is a commonly performed procedure, but as with any medical procedure, can present some risks. Some of the risks of feeding tube insertion include pain around the tube insertion site, dislodgement of the feeding tube, and bleeding. Speak with your doctor about any concerns you may have, or risks that may be heightened for you.

Can I Still Eat and Drink with my Feeding Tube?

Depending on the reason for the feeding tube insertion, you may or may not be allowed to consume food or liquid orally. If the tube is placed due to difficulty swallowing such as following a stroke, then you will likely have restrictions on your oral intake. Some patients with a feeding tube are still allowed to eat or drink following the procedure. It is important to discuss this with your doctor.

How Long Will I Have my Feeding Tube?

Some patients only need a feeding tube for a short period of time, while others will use a feeding tube for the rest of their lives. The duration of use for a feeding tube depends on the cause of the condition. The tube itself will need to be replaced regularly to prevent clogging or deterioration.